Old People's Church

Frank Garner
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Old People's Church

A recently heard a couple of young women (seventeen year olds) talking about attending their church services the previous Sunday. When asked if she attended, one of the girls responded, "Yes, but if they don't leave me alone, I may just stop going." Her friend asked her what she meant by that. What were they doing to her that was so upsetting? The young lady replied that the older people in the congregation were trying to get her to stop attending the "young people's service" and start attending the "old people's church."

She went on to express that "old people's church" was sooo boring. Its music was dull. They just sat, listened to the preacher, and sang dull songs. Sometimes, she enjoyed the choir, but other than that, she did not like those services. Those services did not mean anything to her. She did not get anything out of them. In contrast, the "young people's services" had a more relaxed atmosphere, contemporary music, things designed to interest her. And, she restated that if they did not leave her alone about it, she just would not go at all.

I do not know the denomination or the congregation that this young person was attending. I do know that they have created a monster that will devour their young. I fear that this young person and many like her are primed to follow after even more variant practices that will carry her further away from the worship of our Lord than she already is. Or, she will, as she said, just stop going all together.

Whose fault is it? Clearly the young lady has a twisted idea of her responsibility to worship. The congregation or denomination created the "young people's service" along with a multitude of other separate groups that this young lady attended through her formative years. How can they be surprised when she cannot be fenced in?

In a study called "Sunday School With Its Related Problems," brother Larry Robertson wrote the following. "It is a proven fact that one step in the wrong direction will surely lead to another. The devil never seems to be satisfied when he succeeds in getting us to step over the line. He wants a greater advantage. He keeps pushing us further away from the truth. When we have 'jumped the fence,' and are feeding in 'strange pastures,' other fields seem as green (or greener), and those that feed on the lush grass therein beckon us to come join them. Why not? And you will notice, the next fence is not so high and difficult to get across, nor are we so reluctant to jump this one as we were the first. Just so, we are where we are today. -fg